New Jersey Transit
NJ TRANSIT is New Jersey's public transportation corporation. Its mission is to provide safe, reliable, convenient and cost-effective transit service with a skilled team of employees, dedicated to our customers' needs and committed to excellence.
Covering a service area of 5,325 square miles, NJ TRANSIT is the nation's third largest provider of bus, rail and light rail transit, linking major points in New Jersey, New York and Philadelphia.
The agency operates a fleet of 2,027 buses, 711 trains and 45 light rail vehicles. On 236 bus routes and 12 rail lines statewide, NJ TRANSIT provides nearly 223 million passenger trips each year.
NJ TRANSIT also administers several publicly funded transit programs for people with disabilities, senior citizens and people living in the state's rural areas who have no other means of transportation. In addition, the agency provides support and equipment to privately-owned contract bus carriers.
As the vehicle that connects New Jerseyans with employment, education, health care and recreational opportunities in and around the Garden State, NJ TRANSIT is vital to the state's economic and social well-being, as well as its quality of life.
Directions/Address & Phone

Directions to:
NJ TRANSIT Headquarters
1 Penn Plaza East
Newark NJ 07105
(973) 491-7000

Avoid traffic and parking lot fees and hassles....
Use NJ TRANSIT Rail or Bus service to visit us at our Headquarters building in Newark!

Take any Northeast Corridor, North Jersey Coast Line, or Raritan Valley Line train to Newark Penn Station or take a Morris & Essex Line train to Newark Broad Street Station. Round-trip shuttle bus service (a 9-minute ride) is available to Newark Penn Station. Exit thru the rear of the Newark Penn Station and you'll see the NJ TRANSIT Headquarters directly across the street.

The following buses offer frequent service to and from Newark Penn Station:
1, 5, 11, 21, 25, 28, 29, 34, 39, 44, 62, 67, 70, 71, 72, 73, 75, 76, 78, 79, 108, 319, 978

For specific schedule information, please visit our Bus Schedule page.

From New Jersey Turnpike:
Take exit 15E (Newark/Jersey City). After toll, follow signs to Newark/Raymond Blvd. Stay on Raymond Blvd. and follow to Newark Penn Station. Penn Station will be on your left, NJ TRANSIT headquarters will be on your right. Pay parking is available.

From Garden State Parkway :
Take exit 145 (East Orange/Rt.280 East). Follow 280 East to Exit 15 (marked Rt. 21 South Downtown). At the bottom of the ramp at the traffic light, make a right onto Rt. 21 (also called McCarter Highway South). Proceed on McCarter Highway to Raymond Blvd. and make a left. Continue on Raymond Blvd. (Gateway Hilton and Newark Penn Station will be on your right). Go under railroad bridge and NJ TRANSIT Headquarters will be on your left. Pay parking is available.

From Lincoln Tunnel:
Take Rt. 3 West to exit for Rt. 21 (Newark). Continue on Rt. 21 until highway runs out and becomes McCarter Highway. Continue on McCarter Highway to Raymond Blvd. Make a left onto Raymond Blvd. (Gateway Hilton and Newark Penn Station will be on your right). Go under railroad bridge, and NJ TRANSIT Headquarters will be on your left. Pay parking is available.

From Holland Tunnel:
Follow signs for 1 & 9 South (keep to your left). Take Pulaski Skyway to the Raymond Blvd. exit. Continue on Raymond Blvd. to Newark Penn Station. Penn Station will be on your left, and NJ TRANSIT Headquarters will be on your right. Pay parking is available.

Directions to:
NJ TRANSIT General Office Building
180 Boyden Avenue
Maplewood, New Jersey 07040


Parking is available in the General Office Building parking deck, and visitors may park in the visitor spots located in the front of the building. Parking for NJ TRANSIT related business is NOT permitted in the munincipal swimming pool lot. The visitors entrance is in front of building on Boyden Avenue.

From Garden State Parkway South:
Take exit 143. Continue straight onto Washington Avenue. At 2nd light, make a right onto Springfield Avenue. Go approximately 10 lights to Boyden Avenue and make a right. The General Office Building is the second building on the right.

From Garden State Parkway North:
After the Union Toll Plaza, stay on the right for exit 142 A. At the end of the ramp make a left onto Union Avenue. Proceed one block to a "T" intersection and make a left onto Mill Road. Mill Road becomes Boyden Avenue after the 3rd traffic light. Cross over Springfield Avenue, and the General Office Building will be the second building on your right .

From Route 78 East:
After mile marker 45, bear right for local (outer) lanes and take "Maplewood" Exit #49 B onto Springfield Avenue. Continue 1 1/2 miles (approximately 11 traffic lights) and make a left onto Boyden Avenue. The General Office Building will be the second building on your right.

From Route 78 West:
Take Route 78 West in the local (outer) lanes to Exit #55. Continue straight up the exit ramp to the Lyons Avenue light. Make a right turn onto Lyons Avenue. Make a left turn onto Springfield Avenue. Make a right turn onto Boyden Avenue. The General Office Building will be the second building on your right.

From Downtown Newark:
Travel west on Market Street going towards the Courthouse. Bear left at courthouse onto Springfield Avenue westbound. Continue on Springfield Avenue approximately 3 1/2 miles to Boyden Avenue. Make a right onto Boyden Avenue, and the General Office Building will be the second building on your right.

From Route 280:
Exit onto Garden State Parkway South, then follow the directions from Garden State Parkway South listed above.

From Route 22:
From Route 22 follow signs to Garden State Parkway North, then follow the directions from Garden State Parkway North listed above.

From Route 24 East:
Follow signs to Route 78 East, take the local (outer) lanes and then follow directions from Route 78 East listed above.


Directions to:
NJ TRANSIT Newton Avenue Administration Building
350 Newton Avenue
Camden, NJ 08103


Parking is available at the Newton Avenue Administration Building, which is the smaller building adjacent to the Newton Avenue Garage. The Visitors/Personnel entrance is located under the green awning on the west side of the building.

From Rt. 30 (Admiral Wilson Boulevard):
Follow Rt. 30 West to the exit for Mickle Blvd/Campbell Place/State Aquarium (exit on right just beyond overpass). Follow the ramp to the right and travel over Rt. 30. At the bottom of the hill turn left onto Newton Avenue. The garage is on the left just past the first stop sign. The parking lot entrance is just past the garage. Follow the signs for Personnel/Visitor. Look for the green awning over the double green doors.

From North - NJ Turnpike
Take Turnpike South to exit 4 (Mt. Laurel). Follow sign for Rt. 73 North. Take the ramp for Rt. 38 West. About one mile after you pass Cuthbert Blvd., you will have to merge to the right for the Rt. 30 West/Camden/Ben Franklin Bridge exit. Rt. 30 is also Admiral Wilson Blvd. Then follow the directions from Rt. 30 Admiral Wilson Boulevard, listed above .

From Trenton - 295
Take 295 South to exit #40 (Rt. 38 West- Moorestown). Follow Rt. 38 through approximately 12 traffic lights. About one mile after you pass Cuthbert Blvd., you will have to merge to the right for the Rt. 30 West/Camden/Ben Franklin Bridge exit. Rt. 30 is also Admiral Wilson Blvd. Then follow the directions from Rt. 30 Admiral Wilson Boulevard, listed above .

From South (Atlantic City, Wildwood, etc...)
Take the Atlantic City Expressway towards Camden. The Expressway ends at Rt. 42. Travel on Rt. 42 North for approximately 10 miles to 76-West/676 North. (Stay in the right lanes). Follow 676 North to exit 5A in Camden. (Mickle Blvd./State Aquarium). Upon exiting the ramp you will come to a traffic light (you should be in the middle lane) , go straight and then merge to the right lane. The first street is Newton Avenue. Make a right. The garage is on the left. The parking lot entrance is just past the garage. Follow the signs for Personnel/Visitor. Look for the green awning over the double green doors.

From Points East (Cherry Hill, Mt. Laurel, Marlton, etc...)
Take Rt. 38 or Rt. 70 West towards Camden. They merge in Pennsauken. Stay to the right if traveling on Rt. 70 and merge to the right if traveling on Rt. 38. Take the ramp for Rt. 30 West /Camden/Ben Franklin Bridge. Then follow the directions from Rt. 30 Admiral Wilson Boulevard, listed above .

From Philadelphia (Ben Franklin Bridge)
Stay to the right as you go through the Toll Booths, towards 676 South. Follow 676 South for a short distance, and take the second exit, #5A to (Mickle Blvd/State Aquarium.) The ramp puts you on Federal Street. Just after the traffic light turn right. Sign should read Mickle Blvd/Campbell Place. Go straight at the traffic light then merge to the right lane. The first street is Newton Avenue. Make a right. The garage is on the left just past the first stop sign. The parking lot entrance is just past the garage. Follow the signs for Personnel/Visitor. Look for the green awning over the double green doors.

From Philadelphia (Walt Whitman Bridge)
As you come off the Bridge, stay to the right and take the exit for 676 North. Follow 676 North to exit 5A in Camden. (Mickle Blvd./State Aquarium). Upon exiting the ramp you will come to a traffic light, go straight and then merge to the right lane. The first street is Newton Avenue. Make a right. The garage is on the left. The parking lot entrance is just past the garage. Follow the signs for Personnel/Visitor. Look for the green awning over the double green doors.

History & Structure
Created by the Public Transportation Act of 1979, NJ TRANSIT was established to "acquire, operate and contract for transportation service in the public interest."

In 1980, NJ TRANSIT purchased Transport of New Jersey, the State's largest private bus company at that time. Between 1981-85, the services of several other bus companies were incorporated into NJ TRANSIT Bus Operations, Inc. On January 1, 1983, a second subsidiary, NJ TRANSIT Rail Operations, Inc. was launched to assume operations of commuter rail in the State after Congress ordered Consolidated Rail Corporation (Conrail) to cease its passenger operations. A third subsidiary, NJ TRANSIT Mercer, Inc., was established in 1984 when the agency assumed operation of bus service in the Trenton/Mercer County area. In 1992, following a full reorganization, all three subsidiaries were unified and operations were significantly streamlined.

As stakeholders in NJ TRANSIT, State residents are represented by a seven member Board of Directors, appointed by the Governor. Four members are from the general public and three are State officials. The agency is structured to encourage broad public participation in the formation of transit policy for the State. NJ TRANSIT's board meets monthly at NJ TRANSIT headquarters in Newark. The Governor can override board actions by vetoing the board meeting's minutes.

NJ TRANSIT Corporation's Board selects an Executive Director to administer the entire agency. The Executive Director serves as President of all three subsidiaries (NJ TRANSIT Bus Operations, NJ TRANSIT Rail Operations, Inc. and NJ TRANSIT Mercer, Inc.). In addition, NJ TRANSIT employs a Chief Operating Officer to coordinate operations.

Two transit advisory committees provide the agency with additional input from the public. The North Jersey Transit Advisory Committee and the South Jersey Transit Advisory Committee are each comprised of fourteen unsalaried members. Members of the North Jersey Transit Advisory Committee serve four-year terms. Members of the South Jersey Transit Advisory Committee serve three-year terms.

Executive Director
Veronique ("Ronnie") Hakim was appointed Executive Director of NJ TRANSIT on March 3, 2014. As Executive Director, Ms. Hakim leads the nation's largest statewide public transportation system which provides more than 895,000 weekday trips on 261 bus routes, three light rail lines, 12 commuter rail lines and through the agency's Access Link paratransit service. NJ TRANSIT has combined operating and capital budget in excess of $3 billion and is the third largest transit system in the United States with 165 rail stations, 62 light rail stations and more than 19,000 bus stops linking major points in New Jersey, New York and Philadelphia.
Prior to joining NJ TRANSIT, Ms. Hakim served for nearly four years as Executive Director of the New Jersey Turnpike Authority. While at the Turnpike Authority, Ms. Hakim successfully spearheaded effective cost-cutting initiatives while maintaining the agency's high performance levels. These savings and efficiencies include cutting $10M from NJTA's operating budget, continuing funding of the agency's ambitious $7B Capital Program at a lower cost of capital and bringing a higher level of transparency and accountability to the agency.
Ms. Hakim also served in leadership roles over a 23-year career with the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) in New York City. This included service as Special Counsel at MTA New York City Transit and later as Executive Vice President and General Counsel for Capital Construction at MTA Capital Construction. In that position, she provided senior management with policy and legal advice on numerous large-scale projects, including the Second Avenue Subway, the LIRR East Side Access Project, and the No. 7 Subway Extension Project.

Executive Director Hakim holds a B.A. in political science from the University of Rochester and a J.D. from the Pace University School of Law.

Board Members


Chris Christie
Governor


Kim Guadagno
Lt. Governor


Jamie Fox
Transportation Commissioner &
NJ TRANSIT Board Chairman


Bruce Meisel
Vice Chairman


Regina M. Egea
Governor's Representative


Andrew P. Sidamon-Eristoff
State Treasurer
 


Flora M. Castillo
Member


James C. Finkle Jr., Esq.
Member


Myron P. Shevell
Member


Raymond W. Greaves
Member
 
NJ TRANSIT Corporation
One Penn Plaza East
Newark, NJ 07105-2246
(973) 275-5555 (Customer Service Inquiries)
(973) 491-8800 (Board Inquires)
(973) 491-7071 (Fax)
Submit Feedback to the NJ TRANSIT Board of Directors Click Here
Annual Report & Financial Statement
FY 2013 Annual Report
2013 Annual Report - Printer Friendly Version
FY 2012 Annual Report 2012
Annual
Report  
FY 2011 Annual Report 2011
Annual
Report
FY 2010 Annual Report 2010
Annual
Report
FY 2009 Annual Report 2009
Annual
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FY 2008 Annual Report 2008
Annual
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FY 2007 Annual Report 2007
Annual
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FY 2006 Annual Report 2006
Annual
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FY 2005 Annual Report 2005
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FY 2004 Annual Report 2004
Annual
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Transit Friendly Land Use

Introduction | Development Newsletter | Handbook | Pilot Program | Planning Assistance | Smart Commute Initiative | Transit Village Initiative | Joint Development Projects


New Jersey is on the forefront of Transit - Friendly Land Use. In recent years there has been a growing recognition that transportation plays a key role in the creation and maintenance of livable and sustainable communities. With that in mind, NJ TRANSIT has pledged a strong commitment to working with New Jersey communities to implement transit-oriented development.

NJ TRANSIT's transit-friendly program encourages growth and development where public transportation already exists. Not only is the community revitalization a benefit to the state, but transit-oriented development also reduces the growth of traffic congestion and improves air quality. In addition communities benefit as their train stations and surrounding areas are revitalized, making them attractive places for people to live, work and socialize.

Transit stations are situated in a wide variety of settings throughout New Jersey, ranging from older downtowns to established suburban commuter towns and villages. Many of these municipalities are experiencing pressure to chase "rateables," resulting in disconnected sprawl development rather than integrated, sustainable growth that respects the existing community fabric and takes strategic advantage of the presence of established transit. To balance competing priorities and multiple objectives, municipalities can create and implement sensitive, community-based plans to guide growth in a comprehensive manner, especially in areas where transit can stimulate new development opportunities.

Transit-Friendly Development Newsletter
For the most up to date information on Transit-Friendly Land Use please visit our quarterly newsletter, which is designed in part with Rutgers University's Voorhees Transportation Center, to keep municipal officials, planners and advocates up to date on the potential for development and redevelopment around transit stations.
View newsletter

For more information on Transit Friendly Land Use and Transit Villages, please contact:
Vivian E. Baker, Assistant Director
Transit Friendly Land Use & Development
NJ TRANSIT
1 Penn Plaza East, 4th Floor
Newark, NJ 07105-2246
vebaker@njtransit.com


Planning for Transit-Friendly Land Use: A Handbook for New Jersey Communities
In 1994, NJ TRANSIT created a handbook specifically designed to assist elected and appointed planning officials, members of planning and zoning boards, technical planning staff members and consultants, community representatives and individual citizens interested in improving the relationship between land use planning and transit. The handbook (available on CD-ROM) is a tool communities can use to create and implement transit-friendly land use plans around their transit stations, along their major transit corridors and for proposed new areas of development. Transit-friendly planning is smart growth at its best because it can be used to create an environment around a transit station that supports pedestrian and transit use by providing for a mix of land uses in a safe, clean, vibrant and active place.

Transit-Friendly Communities for New Jersey (TFC) Pilot Program 1999-2002
The TFC is NJ TRANSIT's award-winning pilot community planning assistance program, which was created in 1999 with funding from the Federal Highway Administration. NJ TRANSIT partnered with a consortium of not-for-profit consultant partners (Regional Plan Association, Project for Public Spaces, New Jersey Future, Downtown New Jersey, Rutgers University and the New Jersey Office of State Planning, now known as the Office of Smart Growth) specializing in urban design, transportation planning, downtown revitalization, community outreach and "smart growth" advocacy, to assist competitively selected municipalities with developing community-based visions for transit-friendly development (compact, mixed-use development with a strong residential component) at and surrounding rail stations. Eleven municipalities participated in this program, including Bayonne, Hackensack, Hillsdale, Hoboken, Matawan, Palmyra, Plainfield, Red Bank, Riverton, Rutherford and Trenton.' In March 2002, NJ TRANSIT hosted its first statewide conference focusing on transit-friendly land use visioning, planning and development (Building Better Communities with Transit ? Smart Growth Designs & Planning Strategies). Over 100 municipal, county and state officials, developers, consultants, community activists and interested private citizens were presented with the highlights of the TFC program and the importance of planning for transit-friendly "smart growth." In June 2003, NJ TRANSIT released the TFC program summary report entitled "Building Better Communities with Transit" (available of CD-ROM) that identifies universally applicable, transit-friendly land use best practices and "lessons learned" from the eleven community pilot projects.
The Transit-Friendly Communities for New Jersey Pilot Program has been recognized by both Downtown New Jersey (Best of the Best Award for 2001) and the New Jersey Chapter of the American Planning Association (2002 Smart Growth Award) for demonstrating the smart growth link between transit and land use.

Transit-Friendly Planning Assistance
NJ TRANSIT is committed to assisting communities with planning for transit supportive land use and transit-oriented development at and surrounding our passenger transportation facilities. For the past five years, NJ TRANSIT has provided "Transit-Friendly Planning Assistance" to interested communities through on-call consultants with expertise in transportation planning, urban design, market analysis, economic development, downtown revitalization and community outreach. The result has been the creation of several consensus-based, transit supportive land use "vision plans" that communities are using to guide development and redevelopment at and surrounding existing or proposed transit facilities. By creating local "transit-friendly vision plans," NJ TRANSIT has successfully demonstrated how statewide transportation investments can enhance the environment, create strong community centers, encourage private reinvestment in the local economy and improve the quality of life.
Municipalities that have received technical assistance include South Orange, Rutherford, Morristown, Trenton, Matawan, Hamilton, Secaucus (in conjunction with the New Jersey Meadowlands Commission), Netcong, Cherry Hill, Dover (Morris County), Galloway, Jersey City, Newark, Riverside, Camden, Asbury Park, West Windsor, Somerville and the 13 River LINE light rail station communities.

Smart Commute Initiative
The New Jersey Statewide Smart Commute Initiative gives prospective home buyers throughout the Garden State the opportunity to qualify for a mortgage with the help of savings that can be realized from living near and using public transportation. The Smart Commute Initiative addresses the link between housing affordability and transportation costs, and recognizes that homeowners who spend less on commuting expenses can put the potential savings toward the purchase of a home. If home buyers choose a home within a half-mile of a rail or light rail station, or a quarter-mile of a bus stop, participating lenders will add a portion of their potential transportation savings to their qualifying income -- which could increase their home-buying power and help them buy more home for their money. Nearly a dozen lenders are currently originating the mortgages under the initiative; Fannie Mae is purchasing the eligible loans of up to $333,700. For qualifying borrowers with incomes under 80 percent of area median, mortgages obtained through the NJ Housing Mortgage Finance Agency (HMFA) will have additional incentives. Borrowers under the Smart Commute Initiative receive up to two free NJ TRANSIT one-month passes per household. NJ TRANSIT is the largest transit system in the country to embrace the Smart Commute Initiative.

New Jersey's Transit Village Initiative
New Jersey's Transit Village Initiative was created by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and NJ TRANSIT to acknowledge the existence of transit-friendly, smart growth land use practices in designated municipalities that allow for mixed-use development (with a strong residential component) to occur within a quarter-mile to half-mile radius around rail or bus passenger facilities. A municipality is designated a Transit Village only after much of the visioning, planning and background work have already been completed on the municipal level, and only when it is poised for redevelopment to begin. The Transit Village initiative brings together key state agencies (e.g., New Jersey Department of Transportation, NJ TRANSIT, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, Office of Smart Growth, Council on Affordable Housing, Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency, Main Street New Jersey, New Jersey Economic Development Authority, New Jersey Redevelopment Authority, New Jersey State Council on the Arts, etc.) in support of local efforts to "grow smart" and reinforces the principals of the State Development & Redevelopment Plan. Designated "New Jersey Transit Villages" include Belmar, Bloomfield, Bound Brook, Burlington, Collingswood, Cranford, Elizabeth, Jersey City (Journal Square), Linden, Matawan, Metuchen, Montclair, Morristown, Netcong, New Brunswick, Orange, Pleasantville, Rahway, Riverside, Rutherford, South Amboy, Somerville, South Orange and West Windsor.

Joint Development Projects
The Joint Development Projects is an ongoing endeavor (spearheaded by NJ TRANSIT's Real Estate & Economic Development unit) to competitively solicit transit-oriented development on targeted, NJ TRANSIT-owned properties proximate to rail, light rail, bus or ferry passenger facilities. Goals include creating a non-farebox revenue stream to NJ TRANSIT, expanding commuter parking (where needed or appropriate), creating an economic return to the host municipality (tax ratable) and enhancing the vibrancy and "sense of place" of the transportation facility, particularly as it relates to the host community. The Highlands at Morristown Station, a mixed use development on 3+ acres of NJ TRANSIT-owned property located across the street from the historic train station, consists of 218 residential units, 10,400 square feet of retail space and 736-space parking deck shared by residents, shoppers and commuters. Pending projects include mixed-use development at Bound Brook, Netcong, Somerville and New Bridge Landing (River Edge) rail stations.